In the Parish Chest: Churchwarden & Poor Rate Records

In the Parish Chest – Churchwarden and Poor Rate Records is the fourth and final post of the In the Parish Chest series. The other posts discussed Bastardy Bonds, Settlement Certificates, Examinations and Removal Orders and Apprenticeship records. As early as 1572, Overseers of the Poor were appointed in each parish in England. Their job … Continue reading In the Parish Chest: Churchwarden & Poor Rate Records

James Box – Artificial Limb Maker

Did a serious injury prompt the start of a family business? In 1861, James Box was a young boy of about 14 years old. He lived with his parents, John and Ann Box, and several siblings, in Surrey, England.1 By 1871, James was on his own, having moved from Surrey to West Ham, Essex.  James … Continue reading James Box – Artificial Limb Maker

In the Parish Chest: Apprenticeship Records

This is the third post in my In the Parish Chest series. You can learn about bastardy bonds here and Settlement Examinations & Removal Orders here. Was your English ancestor an apprentice? Apprenticeships date back to as early as the 16th century when young boys were formally bound to a master, usually a craftsman, who … Continue reading In the Parish Chest: Apprenticeship Records

In the Parish Chest: Settlement Examinations, Settlement Certificates, Removal Orders

As we learned in my last post on bastardy bonds, parishes in England did not want to be financially liable for the support of individuals or families settling within their boundaries who could not provide for themselves. In England, the Poor Relief Act of 1662, also known as the Settlement and Removal Act came into … Continue reading In the Parish Chest: Settlement Examinations, Settlement Certificates, Removal Orders

In the Parish Chest: Bastardy Bonds

Bastardy Bonds can be a great resource when trying to locate a birth date and place when vital records may not exist or in placing someone in a specific area at a specific time. In England, these records were created on a parish level before 1834 and on county and poor law union levels beginning … Continue reading In the Parish Chest: Bastardy Bonds

The Youngest Among Us

“I will lend you, for a little time, A child of mine, He said. For you to love the while he lives, And mourn for when he's dead.” Edgar Guest (1881-1959) It is always difficult to comprehend the deaths of the youngest among us. All of us have come across sad family stories. When they … Continue reading The Youngest Among Us

Music and Miners

In the coal mining districts of County Durham, England, in the 19th and 20th centuries, almost every colliery (coal mine) had a colliery band. Bands were sponsored by the local mining communities and were a source of great pride for the working men who played in the band and the community who attended their performances. … Continue reading Music and Miners

St. Mary’s Changing Churchyard

Towards the end of 1945, Jean Mary Davis (my second cousin twice removed) married John Clement Rix at St. Mary’s, the parish church at Norton Cuckney in Nottinghamshire1. I recently came across this wonderful photograph of them stepping out of the front doors of the church just after they had been married2. The war had … Continue reading St. Mary’s Changing Churchyard

Two True Friends – the Soldier and the Nurse

Charlotte Lillie Davis never married and probably would have been known as the maiden aunt of the family. However, that doesn’t mean she never loved nor led a fulfilling and interesting life. She was my second great grand-aunt; a daughter, a sister, an aunt, a niece, and a fiancée. Very little is known about Charlotte’s … Continue reading Two True Friends – the Soldier and the Nurse

Family Heirloom: The Thomas family bible.

The family bible is one of the most precious heirlooms a genealogist can have. A few years ago, my father was visiting his brother in England, and the subject of the family bible came up. My uncle was kind enough to pass the bible on to me, knowing of my passion for genealogy.  It is … Continue reading Family Heirloom: The Thomas family bible.