Seaman’s Protection Certificates – An Unusual Source

In an earlier post I compared Ancestry’s then new “U.S., Army Transport Service, Passenger Lists, 1910-1939” to draft registrations to answer the question of whether someone who registered for the draft actually went on to serve. I used as an example, the five Zimmerman brothers, who all registered for the draft but didn’t all end up serving. One of those brothers, Charles Stephen Zimmerman, was in training with the Merchant Marines in June 1918 and therefore exempt from military service. In the course of my research into Charles and his Merchant Marine service I came across an unusual and remarkable source. A source which not only gave a physical description of Charles, but also had his thumb print, his signature, date and place of birth and current age, and best of all, his photograph. The source was Charles’ application for a Seaman’s Protection Certificate made on 14 August 1918.1

Seaman Snip Photo

Seaman Snip thumb

What are Seaman’s Protection Certificates?

According to NARA (The National Archives and Records Administration) these documents were issued during the late 18th century through the early half of the 20th century, at all U.S. ocean and Great Lakes ports, and served as a seaman’s passport. Those applying had to be United States citizens and had to provide evidence of such in the form of a birth certificate, or an affidavit by a relative or friend, or a citation to naturalization proceedings. 2 Often those documents were appended to the application. In Charles’ case, no other documents are in his file but there is a note indicating he provided his birth certificate, from the parish priest at St. Mary’s church in Stockton, California.

Seaman Snip parish priest
“Affiant produced birth cert. from Parish Priest St. Mary’s Church Stockton showing place of birth as Stockton Cal.”

The history of the Seaman’s Protection Certificate

These certificates were first issued to American sailors to prevent them from being impressed into service by British warships in the period leading up to the War of 1812. Impressment was the forced recruitment of men, practiced most often by the British Navy, into service on their ships.

During the years of American slavery, free men of color who were sailors or seamen, were also issued these protection certificates to prove they were not slaves when stopped by officials or slave catchers. Frederick Douglass himself used the ‘protection papers’ of a free man of color, a sailor, to escape: 3

“It was the custom in the State of Maryland to require of the free colored people to have what were called free papers. This instrument they were required to renew very often, and by charging a fee for this writing, considerable sums from time to time were collected by the State. In these papers the name, age, color, height and form of the free man were described, together with any scars or other marks upon his person which could assist in his identification. This device of slaveholding ingenuity, like other devices of wickedness, in some measure defeated itself—since more than one man could be found to answer the same general description. Hence many slaves could escape by impersonating the owner of one set of papers; and this was often done as follows: A slave nearly or sufficiently answering the description set forth in the papers, would borrow or hire them till he could by their means escape to a free state, and then, by mail or otherwise, return them to the owner. The operation was a hazardous one for the lender as well as for the borrower. A failure on the part of the fugitive to send back the papers would imperil his benefactor, and the discovery of the papers in possession of the wrong man would imperil both the fugitive and his friend. It was therefore an act of supreme trust on the part of a freeman of color thus to put in jeopardy his own liberty that another might be free. It was, however, not infrequently bravely done, and was seldom discovered. I was not so fortunate as to sufficiently resemble any of my free acquaintances as to answer the description of their papers. But I had one friend—a sailor—who owned a sailor’s protection, which answered somewhat the purpose of free papers—describing his person and certifying to the fact that he was a free American sailor. The instrument had at its head the American eagle, which at once gave it the appearance of an authorized document. This protection did not, when in my hands, describe its bearer very accurately. Indeed, it called for a man much darker than myself, and close examination of it would have caused my arrest at the start.” 

douglass image
Example of Seaman’s Protection Certificate from 1854. Image credit: “Seaman’s Protection Certificate for Samuel Fox, August 12, 1854.” African American Odyssey: Free Blacks in the Antebellum Period, Documenting Freedom, Black History Collection, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress.

According to an article in Prologue, the magazine of the National Archives, almost a third of applications were for free men of color. 4 African American research can be difficult, these Seaman’s Protection certificates can be great value to those researchers. The Prologue article is excellent and worth reading to get further information on this unusual source.

The use of these certificates as a form of identification went on until just before the Civil War and then was reintroduced for a short period during the World War 1 time frame which is when Charles S. Zimmerman applied for one.

Besides giving Charles’ physical description and date and place of birth, the certificate also indicated where Charles had trained and the ship he was expected to join. For those seamen who were not born in the United States, their certificates may contain information on where and when they were naturalized, including the names of their parents. Those who witnessed the application were sometimes related to the applicant, providing further clues to follow.

CharlesStephenZimmerman1897_military
Charles S. Zimmerman in uniform

Seaman’s Protection Certificates are definitely an unusual source for genealogists, with an interesting history. It’s worth your time to take a look and see if your ancestor may have applied for one.  Both Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org have collections of Seaman’s Certificates, search their catalogs using the keyword ‘Seaman’ or ‘Seaman’s Protection’.

This post was written for the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge from Amy Johnson Crow. Week 38 prompt: Unusual Source

 


  1. “U.S., Applications for Seaman’s Protection Certificates, 1916-1940”, database with images, Ancestry.com, (www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 September 2018), application for Charles S. Zimmerman, number 9882; citing NARA; Application for Seaman´s Protection Certificates; NAI: 2788575; Record Group Title: Records of the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation; Record Group Number: 41; Box Number: 112 – San Francisco. 
  2. “Applications for Seaman’s Protection Certificates, 1916-1940”, index, NARA (http://www.catalog.archives.gov : accessed 20 September 2018), Records of the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation, 1774-1982, Record Group: 41. 
  3. Frederick Douglass, Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Hartford, Connecticut : Park Publishing Co., 1882), 223-224; digital images, Archive.org (https://archive.org/details/lifetimesoffrede1882doug : accessed 20 September 2018). 
  4. Ruth Priest Dixon, “Genealogical Fallout from the War of 1812”, Prologue. Spring 1992, Vol. 24, No. 1. National Archives (https://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1992/spring/seamans-protection.html : accessed 20 September 2018). 

RootsTech 2019

RootsTech registration opens tomorrow, on 20 September 2018, and a tentative schedule has just gone up. It’s subject to change but take a look and see the incredible variety of classes that will be offered!

2019 will be my 5th year attending RootsTech and my first year as a RootsTech Ambassador. I’m excited to see what’s in store. A few weeks ago, RootsTech announced that they would be expanding to London in 2019! What an incredible opportunity for those who live in the UK and Europe to experience RootsTech for themselves. You can find more information here.

Have you attended RootsTech? Thinking about going in 2019?  Here are my Top 5 reasons to attend RootsTech:

 1.  Making connections. RootsTech 2019’s theme is “Connect. Belong.” There is nothing more exhilarating than being in a place with thousands of other people who share your passion for genealogy, and feeling like you are where you belong. But even more than that, RootsTech brings together family and friends…those you know, and those you discover. For the last three years, RootsTech has been the meeting place for myself and my good friend, Kandace. We met about 18 years ago in Colorado as new moms with baby boys. Our families grew and we moved to different states but stayed in touch. In 2016, I invited Kandace to attend RootsTech with me and a tradition was born. Every year since we have met in Salt Lake City to attend RootsTech together. Connecting is what RootsTech does so well.

RootsTech-us

2.  With over 300 classes to pick from, you will find one that suits you perfectly. From beginners to those who are advanced researchers, RootsTech offers a great variety of classes. Challenge yourself to learn something new.

rootstech-class
3.  The Expo Hall. Hundreds of vendors, offering just about everything you can think of to do with genealogy. Be sure to allow yourself a good chunk of time to visit the Expo Hall. There is so much to see, so many vendors to talk to, presentations to attend and swag to collect. It’s one of my favorite things about RootsTech!

rootstech-collage_flat

4.  Keynote Speakers. Be inspired by interesting and engaging keynote speakers. Two of my favorite speakers from 2018 were Scott Hamilton and Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr. I look forward to hearing who the speakers will be for 2019!

rootstech-dark
5.  Proximity to the Family History Library. RootsTech takes place at the Salt Palace Convention Center, only a block from the Family History Library. Spend some quality research time here among the thousands of records and books. Each year I fly into Salt Lake City a day or two before RootsTech starts so that I can work in the Library.

FHL-collage

I hope you’ll join me at RootsTech 2019!  Registration for RootsTech 2019 opens tomorrow, 20 September 2018. Register early to take advantage of early bird pricing! Look out for the free RootsTech pass I’ll be giving away on my blog.

And for more information on everything RootsTech, check out the Road to RootsTech 2019 here.

 

 

In the Parish Chest: Apprenticeship Records

ParishChestApprenticeship

This is the third post in my In the Parish Chest series. You can learn about bastardy bonds here and Settlement Examinations & Removal Orders here.

Was your English ancestor an apprentice? Apprenticeships date back to as early as the 16th century when young boys were formally bound to a master, usually a craftsman, who would teach the apprentice his trade. From 1563, the Statute of Apprentices made apprenticeships mandatory for anyone who wanted to take up a trade. This meant that no one could call themselves a Master of a trade without serving a 7-year apprenticeship.

Commonly, it was the child’s father who would put him up for an apprenticeship. It was more financially feasible for many poor families to apprentice out a child than to raise him.  In 1601, authority was given to the Overseers of the Poor for the parish, to locate an apprenticeship for any children who were orphaned or considered a pauper.

Although most apprenticeships were sought within the parish, there were times when the Overseers of the Poor would advertise in the local newspapers as seen below:1

Newspaper1

Overseers Apprenticeship Registers

Once an apprenticeship was secured for a child, the Overseers of the Poor would write down the details in an Apprenticeship Register. They would record details such as the date of the indenture, the name of the apprentice, their age, their parents’ names and abode, the name of the Master and his or her trade and residence, and the terms of the apprenticeship (in years). The register would be signed by the Overseers of the Poor and the Magistrate giving consent.

Below is an example of an Overseers Apprenticeship Register for Rothwell, West Yorkshire.2  On 12 October, 1802, 11-year old Sarah Fothergill was apprenticed out to Nathan Nichols, a farmer.  Her father was David Fothergill and her mother was noted as dead. The family’s residence was noted as ‘no settled place’. Sarah would be apprenticed to Nathan Nichols for 10 years, until her 21st birthday.

Apprenticeship-1

An Order of Indenture would then be created by the Churchwardens and Overseers of the Poor and presented to the Justices of the Peace for their approval. The proposed Master will have been interviewed as to his circumstances and character as well as the parents of the apprentice, if they were alive. The Overseers would recommend that the indenture be made.

In the example below dated 12 December 1818, a father, John Hollingrake has put up his son, William Hollingrake, as an apprentice. The order states that “William Hollingrake, a poor child, which its parents are not able to maintain” is proposed as an apprentice to Thomas Sutcliffe, a spinner, of the parish of Langfield, West Yorkshire. The Order of Indenture is signed by the Justices of the Peace and an Indenture is made.3

41440_1831101881_2383-00006

The Apprenticeship Indenture was a legal document setting out the terms for the apprentice and the master.  The age of the apprentice is given and the length of the apprenticeship. William Hollingrake’s indenture states he was 12 years and four months old and would serve as an apprentice to Thomas Sutcliffe until he was 21 years old. Thomas Sutcliffe is to teach William a trade, and “find, provide for, and allow unto his said Apprentice, sufficient wholesome and competent Meat, Drink, Washing, Lodging, Apparel, and all other Necessaries…during all the said Term.” The indenture also states that should Thomas Sutcliffe die within the period of indenture, the agreement would terminate within three months of his death. For the apprentice, they were bound to serve their master and willingly perform his duties and be a “good and faithful Servant”.4

41440_1831101881_1912-00008

Interestingly enough, on the same day, 12 December 1818, William’s younger brother, John Hollingrake, only 9 years old, was also apprenticed out to John Baron, a weaver. Two years later, on 19 August 1820, Betty Hollingrake, just turned 9 years old, was apprenticed out to Abraham Sunderland, also a weaver. And four years later, Abraham Hollingrake, aged 9, was apprenticed out to James Barnes, a weaver.  All were children of John Hollingrake, living in the Parish of Langfield, West Yorkshire.

Some interesting facts on Apprenticeships:

  • An apprenticeship was for a period of seven years but many children were apprenticed at very young ages and often spent nine or ten years with their master. The 1563 Act determined that apprentices were bound until they were 24 years old, but this was later reduced to 21 in 1768.
  • During the Indenture period, the apprentice could not marry or start his own household. He could not gamble or visit a public house (a place selling alcoholic drinks).
  • The Stamp Act of 1709 put a tax on the Indenture and this practice lasted until 1808. Due to this practice, apprenticeship records were recorded more centrally. This is why it is often easier to find records in the period 1700s to early 1800s than after 1808. However, parishes were exempt from having to pay the tax with the result that their apprenticeship records were not recorded or accounted for in any central manner.
  • Persons aged 12-20 could not refuse an apprenticeship if a householder of sufficient means demands it, unless they are already apprenticed elsewhere. If they did refuse an apprenticeship, they could be imprisoned.
  • The Justice of the Peace was the only person who could break the agreement between apprentice and master. However, many apprentices ran away from masters who mistreated them. These masters advertised in the newspapers for the return of their apprentices. Many times a physical description of the apprentice can be found in the advertisement as seen below.

Below is an example of a newspaper advertisement asking for the return of two apprentices who left their master “without sufficient cause”.5

Abscond

The information you might find on your apprentice will vary from document to document. You may find the names of the parents enabling you to move back a generation in your research. You will often find an age given of an apprentice, allowing you to calculate an approximate year of birth. You will find the trade learned which may help in distinguishing your ancestor from someone else with the same name. You may learn, as in the Hollingrake example above, more about the family structure, including siblings.

Apprenticeship in the United States

There are several extant records for Indentures and Apprenticeships in the United States. A search on FamilySearch.org for ‘apprenticeship’ in the Keyword search box on the Catalog page will result in a list of over 1,400 hits for both the United States and England. You can refine your search further by entering a location. For example, “Apprenticeship Alabama” will result in 13 hits.  The same search terms can be used on the other genealogy research sites to locate records there.

An excellent article on the history of apprenticeship in the United States can be found at the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries.


  1. “Parish Apprentices,” Hull Advertiser and Exchange Gazette, Yorkshire, 28 November 1801, page 2, col. 3; The British Newspaper Archive, (http://BritishNewspaperArchive.co.uk : accessed 4 September 2018). 
  2. West Yorkshire, England, Rothwell Parish, Parish and Township Records Register of Apprentices, 1802-1809, unpaginated; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 September 2018), images 7 & 8 of 11, line 3, entry for Sarah Fothergill, 12 October 1802. 
  3. West Riding, Yorkshire, England, Langfield Township, Apprenticeship Indentures; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 September 2018), order of indenture for William Hollingrake, 12 December 1818. 
  4. West Riding, Yorkshire, England, Langfield Township, Apprenticeship Indentures; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 September 2018), indenture of William Hollingrake, 12 December 1818. 
  5. “Apprentices Absconded,” Hull Advertiser and Exchange Gazette, Yorkshire, 12 September 1801, page 1, col. 2; The British Newspaper Archive, (http://britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk : accessed 4 September 2018). 

In the Parish Chest: Bastardy Bonds

ParishChestBastardy

Bastardy Bonds can be a great resource when trying to locate a birth date and place when vital records may not exist or in placing someone in a specific area at a specific time. In England, these records were created on a parish level before 1834 and on county and poor law union levels beginning in 1834. They are part of a collection of records falling under the title of Parish Chest records. Parish chests were literally chests where the parish kept their records. Ranging from Vestry Minutes to Churchwarden and Poor Rate accounts, to Bastardy Bonds and Apprentice records, these documents recorded the daily workings of the local parish.

Parishes were concerned with not being held financially liable for the birth and upbringing of a child born to an unmarried woman. By the laws of the time, that child, born to an unmarried woman, was considered illegitimate. An unmarried mother faced substantial social stigma in addition to financial hardship. Through a prescribed path, the parish ensured that the financial responsibility for the child would fall on the father. This was especially so in cases where the putative father did not or would not take responsibility.

Bastardy Examinations

When a father would not step forward, the parish would often put pressure on the mother to name the child’s father. This was done under oath and carried out by the Churchwarden or Overseer of the Poor. Their authority came to them from the Bastardy Act of 1575 which allowed them to question an unmarried mother in order to get her to reveal the name of the father.

record-image_S3HT-62T7-ZZL

In the example above, Mary Wells, a single woman, declares upon her oath before the Justices of the Peace on the 29th Day of November 1777 regarding her pregnancy. She states that she is with child and names John Daniels, as having carnal knowledge of her body, on or near the 5th day of July and that she is now pregnant and the child likely to be born in bastardy.  She leaves her mark at the bottom of the page.1

With the father so named, the Churchwardens or Overseers of the Poor would exert considerable pressure on the father to take financial responsibility for the child in the form of a Bastardy Bond.

Bastardy Bonds

This bond of indemnification or bastardy bond ensured that the father was responsible for the child. The bond indemnified or compensated the parish against any future costs until the child was thirteen years of age or had been apprenticed out.  Few men could afford to pay the bond from their own resources, therefore most would have friends or relatives sign as surety on the bond.

bastardybondimage

In the above example, dated 5 August 1817, Elizabeth Leavers, single woman, of the parish of Radford, has sworn by oath that she is now pregnant with a child by Thomas Greenwood. Thomas Greenwood, and two other men, James Greenwood and William Burrey, all of the town of Nottingham, have signed this bond, indicating Thomas’ acceptance of the charge and his assurance that he will maintain the child. The men have, under oath, sworn that a bond of £100.00 would be payable to the Churchwardens and Overseers of the Poor of the Parish of Radford in the County of Nottingham, should Thomas Greenwood fail to take care of the child.2

Bastardy Bond recorded in the Petty Sessions

After the New Poor Law of 1834, the parish authorities lessened their role in bastardy cases leaving the woman the option of applying herself for the bond from the Petty Sessions.

bastardybondimage2

In this example, Mary Berry, a single woman, has appeared before the Justices of the Peace in the County of the Borough and Town of Berwick-upon-Tweed on 14 March 1850. The bond states that Mary Berry was delivered of a female bastard child within the twelve months previous. She names James Mills Taylor of the Parish of Bamburgh in the County of Northumberland, a laborer, as the father. A summons was issued for James Mills Taylor to appear at the Petty Session. Towards the bottom of the page, an exact date of birth is given for the child, 22 January 1850.  Mary Berry has provided enough evidence that the Justices of the Peace declare they are satisfied and they declare James Mills Taylor the putative father. He is ordered to pay Mary Berry an amount of 5 shillings weekly for the first six weeks from the birth of the child. He is further ordered to pay the sum of one shilling and sixpence to Mary Berry until the child is 13 years of age. There were some conditions to this: should Mary Berry be of unsound mind, or in jail or under sentence of transportation or should she remarry, the payment would go to whoever was declared the child’s custodian. Should the child die before his thirteenth birthday, Mary Berry would no longer receive any monies.  Further, the father, James Mills Taylor, was also to pay Mary Berry, 19 shillings and sixpence, the costs incurred in obtaining the order.3

Where to find Bastardy Bonds

For England records:

Parish chest records are listed in the Place Search of the FamilySearch Catalog under:

  • England, [county name], [parish name] – Church records
  • England, [county name], [parish name] – Poorhouses, Poor Law
  • England, [county name], [parish name] – Taxation

Most bastardy bonds are kept on the county level in England and are not online. Many county record offices have an online presence that may allow you to determine if they hold such records and what the cost may be in accessing them.

For US records:

  • If you are lucky enough to be researching in North Carolina, they have extensive records for each county.
  • Other states have bastardy bonds, but they are not as extensive. To see what is available on the FamilySearch Catalog, a keyword search of “bastardy bonds” can be used to indicate which counties kept these records. To narrow down the search even more, include the state or the state and county that you are researching in to see what is available. These bonds are not yet indexed.
  • The bastardy bonds are not likely online for every county. They may be found in person at the county courthouses, if still preserved.
  • For FindmyPast.com a search in the A-Z of Record Sets with the keywords ‘bastardy bonds’, ‘parish chest’ or ‘Poor Law’ will locate records.
  • For Ancestry.com search the Card Catalog with the terms ‘bastardy’, ‘poor law’ or ‘quarter sessions’.

Have you used bastardy bonds in your research?

This is the first post in a series on Parish Chest records.
Coming up next: In the Parish Chest: Settlement and Removal Certificates

 


  1. Norfolk County, North Elmham Parish, Bastardy Examinations, 1765-1811, Examination of Mary Wells, 29 November 1777; images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-62T7-ZZL?cat=1013166 : accessed 20 August 2018). 
  2.  Nottinghamshire County, Court of Quarter Sessions of the Peace, Bastardy Bonds, 1817-1818, 5 August 1817, Elizabeth Leavers to Thomas Greenwood on bastardy charge; images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSNW-C3Z8?cat=635885 : accessed 20 August 2018, images 719 & 729 of 1934). 
  3. “England, Northumberland, Cumberland, Durham, Miscellaneous Records, 969-2007,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L93Y-2HHN?cc=1918635&wc=7VZB-7V7%3A209394801%2C210421601%2C210422501 : 20 May 2014 : accessed 21 August 2018), Northumberland > Berwick-upon-Tweed > Bastardy bonds, 1850-1859, image 2 of 214; Northumberland Archives Service, Ashington. 

Headed to RootsTech 2018? Let’s Get Organized!

Rootstech-headerRootsTech 2018 is 19 days away! Are you ready?  This will be my 4th time attending and over the years I’ve learned a few things about organizing myself for each day’s classes and for research time in the Family History Library.

How I organize for RootsTech’s incredible line up of classes

First thing to do is to download the RootsTech mobile app. It’s available from the App Store and the Google Play Store. Using the app you are able to create your personalized schedule for each day. As you read through each of the class descriptions you can ‘star’ them, which moves them to your daily schedule (My Schedule on the app). I always pick my top choice class and a back up class for each hour. I also note when lunch is and when the Expo Hall will be open. Once you have finished selecting classes for each day, tap the gear icon on the upper right-hand side of the screen and slide down to a reddish box which says ‘Email My Show Summary’. You can email your class schedule to yourself or share it with a friend attending with you.

What about syllabus material for each class?

Handouts are only available on the app but can be downloaded or emailed to yourself. To do this, tap on My Schedule (which you have already created) and tap on your first selected class. Move down the page that shows information on that class until you come to the very bottom where it says ‘Resources’. Under that is ‘Handouts’. Tap on ‘Handouts’ and if the class has one, it will ask you if you would like to Take Notes on the Handout, Download Handout or Email Handout. I prefer to email the handout to myself. You will receive an email with a PDF of that classes’ handout. I print that out and write the location and time of the class in the upper right-hand corner.

notes1
I then place them in day and time order in my binder. This way I don’t have to keep referring to my phone to see what’s next on my schedule. I can look at my binder and it’s all organized there. I use the back of the handouts to make any notes during that class.  Everyone has a different system to keep themselves organized. I’ve used this one all the years I’ve attended RootsTech and it’s worked well. My binder also has a place for pens and pencils, flash drives, business cards and more paper. I like having it all in one place.

notes2

How I organize for research at the world-famous Family History Library

Going to RootsTech means making time for research at the Family History Library. Over the years I’ve worked out a system that keeps me on track and organized. My biggest tip for researching here is to plan ahead! There are lots of BSO’s (those distracting Bright Shiny Objects) hiding in the library and it’s easy to get sidetracked. It’s not always a bad thing to be lured in by a BSO, actually it can be kind of fun! But when you’re fitting in time between RootsTech classes or at the end of a busy and mentally exhausting day, you want to try to stay on track.

As I research I use the Research Log report on my desktop family history software to keep track of the films or books that I need to look at when I am next at the Family History Library and which are not available online. Use FamilySearch.org to find the correct film or book and check whether it has been digitized or not. If not, I add that information to a spreadsheet I have set up with columns as shown below.

Notes3
I try to be very clear about the information I am looking for. I create these Research Logs as I work on projects and it can sometimes be months since I marked that I needed to look at a specific film for information. I don’t want to spend time having to pull up my family history software program and look at why I wanted that information. Each item is numbered in the far-left hand column. That number is what I use in my handwritten notes as a reference for any information I find or do not find. Of course, I also add the film or book number again on the notes I am making in the library, as well as any notes on whether I photocopied, downloaded or transcribed the image. I never transfer any information to my family history software until I am back home and able to carefully evaluate it first. Some may prefer to use a preprinted Research Log template to write down what you find in the Library but those never seem to have enough space for me to write in.

Notes4

RootsTech is always a whirlwind of great education and fun socializing. Get the most out of your RootsTech trip by getting and staying organized!

What tips do you have on staying organized at RootsTech?

 

Genealogy Education – The Boston University Certificate in Genealogical Research.

learn-1820039_1920

  • Want to hone your research skills?
  • Learn to write professional research reports?
  • Critically analyze documents?
  • Network with others passionate about genealogy?
  • Learn from the best of the best in the genealogy world?

Then keep reading …

My blog has been quiet for the past 3 months as I threw myself into the Boston University Certificate in Genealogical Research. The course ended about 2 weeks ago and I have been thinking about my experience. A quick disclaimer – I have no association with the B.U. course except that I recently completed it.

The Boston University Certificate in Genealogical Research is a 15-week online course covering modules in Foundations of Genealogical Research, Problem-Solving Techniques and Technology, Evidence Evaluation and Documentation, Forensic Genealogical Research, and Professional Genealogy. It is taught by some of the best genealogists in the country (more about who they are can be found here), sharing their knowledge and expertise in an online setting. Together with experienced teaching assistants, they guide students through each module, encouraging discussion among the 30 or so students in each group and providing feedback on assignments.

The assignments are tough and I appreciated that. I wanted the opportunity to put into practice what I was learning and they provided an effective way to do that. Each assignment is graded and you need at least a C in each module, with a final grade of at least a B- to earn the certificate.

This course is time-consuming (20-30 hours of work a week). Many fellow students worked full time and participated in the course outside of their work day, and were able to keep up with it. I was fortunate to be able to focus exclusively on the course and many times put in more than 30 hours a week. Between online course work, all the readings (including supplemental and mandatory readings), the discussion forums and the assignments, there is certainly enough to keep one very busy.

I did many hours of research prior to signing up for the course as I wanted to spend my genealogy education dollars wisely. The course is expensive, there’s no way of getting around that fact. However, I am happy to report that I feel like my expectations were exceeded and my money well spent. My goal is to become a Certified Genealogist and I felt like this course gave me the skills and confidence to see that I am capable of achieving that. [Note: The Boston University course results in being able to say, if you pass the course, that you are a holder of a Certificate in Genealogical Research. You are not a Certified Genealogist after the course.]

One of the side benefits of this course is that you get to meet other students as passionate about genealogy as you are. Each bring their experience and knowledge to the group and that fosters great discussion. I am looking forward to meeting up with my new-found friends at upcoming genealogy conferences.

If you are thinking about genealogy education, I would highly recommend this course. I believe the next course starts in January 2018. More information can be found here.

Top Tips for RootsTech 2017

rootstech

RootsTech 2017 is 3 weeks away.  Time to get organized!

  • Classes: Decide which classes you want to attend. This is probably the hardest as there are going to be multiple classes that you would love to attend all happening at the same time.  Decide on your top 3 choices.  Then, if your number one class is full you are ready with your next choice.  Use the RootsTech App to keep track of your personalized daily schedule.
  • Family History Library: Build in time in your schedule for the Family History Library. I am heading up a day early to take advantage of the proximity of the Library to the Salt Palace Convention Center where RootsTech 2017 is taking place.  Make sure you know what you want to look at in the Library and make good use of your research time.  The Family History Library is a black hole when it comes to how fast time flies whilst there!
  • Network: RootsTech is a great place for networking with friends and colleagues. It’s a great place to make new contacts too.   Make the effort to meet in person those genie friends you know online.  It doesn’t hurt to have a business card to hand out!
  • Electronics: almost every RootsTech attendee will have their laptop or tablet with them.  Some attendees take notes on them or quickly look up a new website being mentioned by a presenter.  You’ll want your updated genealogy software program on there, especially if you plan to do research at the Family History Library.  Don’t forget those chargers.
  • Comfy shoes! No need to explain further.  The Salt Palace Convention Center is huge, you’ll be walking a lot.

5-tips

Bonus Tip:

I like to print out the syllabus for each session and use that to make notes on.   I also write where that session will be taking place on the top of the handout.  I then file them in the order the classes will be happening each day.  As of the time of writing, the syllabi for each session is not on the RootsTech website yet but they do seem to be available via the RootsTech app.  I was able to click on the session I am interested in and page to the bottom where a link appears for the syllabus (if the presenter has one).   By tapping on it you can select to either Take Notes on the Handout, Download Handout or Email Handout.

Learn more about RootsTech 2017 here.  See you in Salt Lake!